Saturday, 27 October 2012

Wednesday, 24 October 2012

acid rain


 Rain is very important for life. All living things need water to live, even people.
Rain brings us the water we need. But in many places in the world even where you live, rain has become a menace.
Because of pollution in the air, acid gases from factories, cars and homes, the rain is becoming dangerous for the life of every living creature.
This rain is known as 'acid rain'.


Acid gases are produced when fossil fuels like coal and oil are burned in power stations, factories and in our own homes. Most of these acid gases are blown into the sky, and when they mix with the clouds it can cause rain - or snow, sleet, fog, mist or hail - to become more acidic.
The opposites of acid are alkalis; for example, toothpaste and baking powder are both alkalis. Strong alkalis can also be dangerous, such as ammonia and bleach.
Lemon juice, vinegar and cola are all acidic. Rain is naturally acidic, but acid gases make it even more acidic, sometimes as acid as lemon!
Nature can also produce acid gases, such as volcanoes. When they erupt, the smoke that comes out of the crater is also full of acid gases.


Saturday, 20 October 2012

your sense of taste


Taste buds probably play the most important part in helping you enjoy the many flavors of food. 
 Your taste buds can recognize four basic kinds of tastes: sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. 
 The salty/sweet taste buds are located near the front of your tongue; 
the sour taste buds line the sides of your tongue;
 and the bitter taste buds are found at the very back of your tongue.

Everyone's tastes are different. In fact, your tastes will change as you get older.
When you were a baby, you had taste buds, not only on your tongue, but on the sides and roof of your mouth. This means you were very sensitive to different foods.

As you grew, the taste buds began to disappear from the sides and roof of your mouth, leaving taste buds mostly on your tongue.

As you get older, your taste buds will become even less sensitive, so you will be more likely to eat foods that you thought were too strong as a child.


Wednesday, 17 October 2012


What Makes a Mammal?

There are more than 4,000 different species of mammals. The smallest is the hog-nosed bat, which weighs 0.05 ounces. The largest is the blue whale, which can be 100 feet long and weigh 150 tons. But whether they live on land or water, all mammals share some common characteristics.
All mammals:
  • Are vertebrates (which means they have a backbone or spine).
  • Are endothermic. Also known as “warm-blooded,” endothermic animals regulate their own body temperate which allows them to live in almost every climate on Earth.
  • Have hair on their bodies.
  • Produce milk to feed their babies. This allows them to spend more time with their young and teach them important skills they need to survive on their own.



Thursday, 11 October 2012

The Butterfly Life Cycle

Fun article explains the Butterfly Life Cycle, has LOTS of life cycle images and a coloring page too!

The Butterfly Life Cycle

 All butterflies have "complete metamorphosis." To grow into an adult they go through 4 stages: egg, larva, pupa and adult. Each stage has a different goal - for instance, caterpillars need to eat a lot, and adults need to reproduce. Depending on the type of butterfly, the life cycle of a butterfly may take anywhere from one month to a whole year.

Learn about the Butterfly Life Cycle, about the Monarch's life, see Pictures and find Links to more articles.
Butterfly Eggs on a Leaf 

The First Stage: The Egg

A butterfly starts life as a very small, round, oval or cylindrical egg.  Some butterfly eggs may be round, some oval and some may be ribbed while others may have other features. The egg shape depends on the type of butterfly that laid the egg. 
Butterfly eggs are usually laid on the leaves of plants.
Butterfly Life Cycle: Article with Lots of Pictures
Butterfly Caterpillar

The Second Stage: The Larva (Caterpillar)

When the egg hatches, the caterpillar will start his work and eat the leaf they were born onto. This is really important because the mother butterfly needs to lay her eggs on the type of leaf the caterpillar will eat – each caterpillar type likes only certain types of leaves. Since they are tiny and can not travel to a new plant, the caterpillar needs to hatch on the kind of leaf it wants to eat.   
Caterpillars need to eat and eat so they can grow quickly. When a caterpillar is born, they are extremely small. When they start eating, they instantly start growing and expanding.  Their exoskeleton (skin) does not stretch or grow, so they grow by “molting” (sheding the outgrown skin) several times while it grows. 
Fun article explains the Butterfly Life Cycle, has LOTS of life cycle images and a coloring page too!
Caterpillar Becoming a Chrysalis

The Third Stage: Pupa (Chrysalis)

As soon as a caterpillar is done growing and they have reached their full length/weight, they form themselves into a pupa, also known as a chrysalis.  From the outside of the pupa, it looks as if the caterpillar may just be resting, but the inside is where all of the action is.  Inside of the pupa, the caterpillar is rapidly changing. 
Now, as most people know, caterpillars are short, stubby and have no wings at all.  Within the chrysalis the old body parts of the caterpillar are undergoing a remarkable transformation, called ‘metamorphosis,’ to become the beautiful parts that make up the butterfly that will emerge. Tissue, limbs and organs of a caterpillar have all been changed by the time the pupa is finished, and is now ready for the final stage of a butterfly’s life cycle. 

Butterfly Life Cycle: Article with Lots of Pictures
Butterfly Emerging from a Chrysalis

The Fourth Stage: Adult Butterfly

 When the butterfly first emerges from the chrysalis, both of the wings are going to be soft and folded against its body. This is because the butterfly had to fit all its new parts inside of the pupa. 
As soon as the butterfly has rested after coming out of the chrysalis, it will pump blood into the wings in order to get them working and flapping – then they get to fly.  Usually within a three or four-hour period, the butterfly will master flying and will search for a mate in order to reproduce.  
When in the fourth and final stage of their lives, adult butterflies are constantly on the look out to reproduce and when a female lays their eggs on some leaves, the butterfly life cycle will start all over.